Dan's Home Inspections

Dan's Home Inspections InterNACHI-Certified Home Inspections.

Have a safe and happy 4th of July!
07/04/2017

Have a safe and happy 4th of July!

12/25/2016

Merry Christmas!! Hope everyone is having an amazing day!! Safe travels!!

11/25/2016

Hope everyone is having an amazing thanksgiving!!! Happy thanksgiving from us to you!! Have a great rest of you night!

07/26/2016

We have some openings is anyone is looking to buy or sell a home or building and need a home inspection!! Give us a call! 6418472279

ONE MORE DAY. GIVE US A CALL, IF PLANS CHANGE AND YOU CAN MAKE IT JUST COME ON DOWN. WALK INS ARE WELCOME.
05/20/2016

ONE MORE DAY. GIVE US A CALL, IF PLANS CHANGE AND YOU CAN MAKE IT JUST COME ON DOWN. WALK INS ARE WELCOME.

WE ARE GETTING REALLY CLOSE TO THE CLASS!! WE HAVE OPENING STILL IF ANY ONE IS INTERESTED!?!? GIVE US A CALL AT 641-847-...
04/26/2016

WE ARE GETTING REALLY CLOSE TO THE CLASS!! WE HAVE OPENING STILL IF ANY ONE IS INTERESTED!?!? GIVE US A CALL AT 641-847-2279 OF PM ME! EITHER WAY WILL WORK!!

Pot's Plumbing & Heating will be having a MINNESOTA carry class on April 30th! call 641-847-2279 and reserve your spot!
04/20/2016

Pot's Plumbing & Heating will be having a MINNESOTA carry class on April 30th! call 641-847-2279 and reserve your spot!

2 days till the class!! call and reserve your spot!!
02/04/2016

2 days till the class!! call and reserve your spot!!

Pot's is have a concealed carry class Feb. 6th! Call if you have any questions. Also call to reserve your spot!! 641-847...
01/28/2016

Pot's is have a concealed carry class Feb. 6th! Call if you have any questions. Also call to reserve your spot!! 641-847-2279

09/09/2015

We have some openings for an Inspection!! Call and reserve your spot!!

08/21/2015

Hey everyone!! I am was wondering if there was anything you would be interested knowing about!! Just comment below!!

08/14/2015

I found this on International Association of Certified Home Inspectors web site! This is another thing Dan does there are hundreds of things Dan inspects all you have to do is ask!!
For instance..
Aluminum Siding Inspection
by Nick Gromicko and Ethan Ward

Aluminum siding is generally in decline as an exterior cladding material because vinyl siding and other materials have become more popular choices. However, it is still among the most common forms of siding found today. It provided many advantages over other materials when it was introduced in the 1940s. It was installed on many affordable homes through the 1970s.



InterNACHI inspectors will encounter aluminum siding on many home exteriors and can benefit from knowing more about this common form of exterior cladding. Homeowners may be interested in the drawbacks of this material, as well as some of the advantages it still provides in certain situations today.



History and Manufacturing

Aluminum siding is made from aluminum coil stock, which is chemically coated to protect the metal and then painted for further protection, as well as aesthetics. After coating, the siding is baked for durability, with enamel often added to create desired textures.

One of the earliest architectural uses of aluminum came in the 1920s when it was used to produce ornamental spandrel panels for the Chrysler Building and the Empire State Building in New York City. By the 1940s, aluminum siding was being produced for use on residential structures, and quickly became popular due to the advantages it provided over other materials in use at the time. A Pennsylvania subdivision built in 1947 was reportedly the first housing project to use solely aluminum siding.

Its popularity remained fairly steady until the 1970s, during the energy crisis. Aluminum siding requires a great deal of energy for production, as well as consumption of a significant amount of raw materials. These factors largely contributed to its decline in use as other forms of exterior cladding became more popular.

Pros and Cons

Although aluminum siding is seeing less use these days, it possesses some attributes that may be seen as advantageous over other materials in certain situations. There are also some areas where aluminum siding doesn’t stack up quite as well as other options. Here are some pros and cons to consider with aluminum siding.

Advantages
•Aluminum siding is very lightweight.
•It is fairly durable. When properly maintained, it can last from 40 years to the life of the structure.
•It accepts the application of paint well and can be painted any desired color.
•Aluminum siding does not rust.
•It is fireproof. In case of fire, it will not burn or melt like other claddings.
•It is waterproof. When properly installed, it provides excellent water-resistant capabilities for exterior walls.
•Since aluminum siding contains no organic material, it will not rot or serve as a source of food for termites.
•An enamel coating baked onto the surface of the siding can mimic the look of other materials, such as wood grain, which gives the siding a more traditional look.
•Aluminum siding is recyclable.

Disadvantages
•Aluminum siding can dent easily, and the damaged area may be difficult to repair or replace. Many siding manufacturers offer a thin backing board of insulation that fits behind each panel. This backing can help protect against dents.
•Although the siding takes the application of paint well, it may need to be repainted every five to 10 years. If any oxidization has occurred, it must be removed before new paint is applied, which can make for a labor-intensive process. In general, repainting aluminum siding requires preparation similar to repainting a car.
•Scratches in the siding will usually be immediately noticeable and unsightly because they can reveal the metal surface below the paint.
•Although aluminum will not rust because it contains no iron, as opposed to steel siding, it can corrode. It can also be stained by the rust on adjacent materials.
•The sound of rain and hail striking it can be loud enough that some people avoid using it for this reason alone.
•Aluminum siding has gone out of style aesthetically, and is generally considered less desirable than both more traditional and newer, modern forms of exterior cladding.
•The production of aluminum siding requires a large amount of energy and raw materials.

Inspection Tips

Here are some things that inspectors can keep in mind while examining exterior walls clad in aluminum siding:
•Since metal siding can conduct electricity, some jurisdictions require that the siding be grounded as a safety measure. Inspectors can check with the local authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) to find out if grounding is a requirement.
•Aluminum siding can be distinguished from vinyl siding by visual inspection. Any dents in the siding are a clue that it is aluminum, as opposed to vinyl, which may show cracks or breaks.
•Lightly tapping on the siding can also help determine what the material is. Aluminum has a slightly hollow and metallic sound when struck.
•Distinguishing between aluminum and steel siding can be more difficult and may require the use of a magnet, which will interact with steel but not aluminum. Rust spots are another sign that the siding is steel.
•Properly installed aluminum siding should not be in contact with the ground. The AHJ can be consulted for the minimum required clearance.
•If the siding has been installed in contact with the ground or below ground level, outward bulging at the bottom can be an indication that the building sills and/or lower walls have been damaged by rot or pests.

Aluminum siding was very popular in the latter part of the 20th century and is still installed on many homes across the United States today. InterNACHI inspectors who know more about this common type of exterior cladding will be at an advantage when inspecting exteriors and answering clients’ questions.

If you have any questions on what he inspects just give us a call
!! 641-847-2279

Not only do we inspect homes we inspect so much more!! For instants..A Garage InspectionI found this on International As...
08/06/2015

Not only do we inspect homes we inspect so much more!! For instants..
A Garage Inspection
I found this on International Association of Certified Home Inspectors web site! This article is by: Kenton Shepard

A Garage Inspection
This is the exterior of a townhome I was asked to inspect. During the inspection, I ran into a neighbor who told me that the roof of another garage, identical to the one pictured above two buildings down, had collapsed the previous winter under a snow load.

So, I decided to keep my eyes wide open as I went through the garage.
(1st Picture)

Some defects you have to search for, and some are pretty obvious. These first two defects were obvious from the doorway:

•improper alterations; and
•improper bearing points.

Trusses cannot be altered in any way without the approval of a structural engineer. When you see plywood gussets added at truss connections like these triangular gussets, then an alteration of some sort has obviously been made and you have to recommend evaluation by a structural engineer. So, that condition went into the report

Trusses are designed to bear loads at very specific points. Typical roof trusses should not touch any interior walls and should bear only on the exterior walls. The two trusses at the left of the above photo are bearing on an offset portion of the garage wall.

A portion of the structural roof load was being transferred to the bottom chords of the trusses at a point at which they were not designed to support a load.

(2nd Picture)

Then I walked over and looked more closely at the connections where the trusses attached to the wall and found these problems:
•inadequate metal connector (hanger);
•inadequate fasteners (deck screws); and
•improper fastener installation (through drywall).

These trusses would have best been supported by bearing directly on wall framing. The next best solution would be an engineer-designed ledger or engineer-specified hardware. And that may have been how they were originally built, but by the time I inspected them, 24-foot roof trusses were supported by joist hangers designed to support 2x4 joists. The hangers were fastened with four gold deck screws each.

Gold deck screws are designed to resist withdrawal. Fasteners for metal connecters such as joist hangers are designed to resist shear.

Withdrawal force is like the force which would be generated if you grabbed the head of a fastener with pliers and tried to pull it straight out.

Shear force is what’s used if you take a pair of heavy-duty wire cutters and cut the fastener. Fasteners designed to resist withdrawal, such as deck screws, are weak in shear resistance.

So, there were drastically undersized metal connectors fastened by badly under-strength fasteners.

To make matters worse, the screws were fastened through drywall, which doesn’t support the shaft of the screw and degrades the connection even further.

(3rd picture)

And, once I looked really closely, I found more truss alterations. The gangnail had been pried loose and the spikes which form the actual mechanical connection were destroyed. In their place were a couple of bent-over nails. This condition represented a terrific loss of strength and this roof, too, was a candidate for catastrophic structural failure.

In summary, look carefully at connections for problems which may lead to structural issues, as some are more urgent than others. Be sure to call these out in your report. Also, all electrical receptacles in garages must be GFCI-protected, without exception.

(4th picture)

07/29/2015

Well summer is half way over!! Looking to sell or buy a house give us a call!! Best part about having us coming out we also own pot's plumbing and heating!! So if something we can fix we can do that too!! Wouldn't have to call another business!! The convenience is there!! Just give us a call!! 641-847-2279!!

's cover photo
07/15/2015

's cover photo

Hardin County Parade 2015!!
07/09/2015

Hardin County Parade 2015!!

07/08/2015

Are you looking to buy a house or sell a house and you need a home inspection? Well we are just a call away! Just give a call and set something up with us! 641-847-2279

Dan's Home Inspections
03/12/2015

Dan's Home Inspections

's cover photo
03/12/2015

's cover photo

Address

740 Main St
Ackley, IA
50601

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 17:00
Thursday 08:00 - 17:00
Friday 08:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(641) 580-0215

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Dan's Home Inspections posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Dan's Home Inspections:

Category

Nearby realtors & realty services


Other Ackley realtors & realty services

Show All